Puppy & Kitten Wellness

We Offer Packages for Both Puppies and Kittens

Congratulations on the newest addition to your family! All puppies and kittens need a series of vaccinations, deworming, and sometimes baseline blood tests. We treat each new animal as an individual and our doctors will work with you to design a customized wellness plan for your pet. Your first visit is with the doctor, who will discuss vaccination protocols, recommendations for spay or neuter surgery, and answer any questions you may have about your little one. Your next appointments may be with veterinary nurses who booster vaccines, discuss behavior training, and relay any concerns you may have to the doctor.

Puppies:

DA2PP (Distemper Virus & Parvovirus): Canine distemper is a devastating disease that causes fever, pneumonia, vomiting, diarrhea, seizures, and death. Canine parvovirus is highly contagious and exists virtually everywhere in the environment; preventing exposure in your puppy is virtually impossible. Parvovirus attacks the cells of your puppy’s GI tract, causing severe bloody diarrhea, vomiting, fever, weight loss, and death; it may also fatally attack the muscles of the heart.

Your puppy should receive their first wellness exam and DA2PP at 6-8 weeks of age. The DA2PP vaccine includes protection against canine distemper virus, parvovirus, parainfluenza and adenovirus type 1 and 2. Depending on their age at initial vaccination your puppy may need 2 or 3 vaccinations for DA2PP, each given 4 weeks apart. It is important that the last vaccine is given between 15-18 weeks of age, to provide full immunity.

  • Puppies under 12 weeks of age should receive this vaccine three times, 4 weeks apart
  • Puppies 12 weeks or older that have had no previous vaccinations should receive the DA2PP vaccine twice, 4 weeks apart
  • Once your puppy reaches 2 years of age the DA2PP vaccine is given every 3 years

Rabies: Rabies is a devastating and fatal disease that affects our pets, wildlife, and even poses a threat to human health. Many people don’t know that the virus can incubate for up to a year after initial exposure before clinical signs occur; once symptoms begin death occurs within 10 days, and treatment is impossible. Infected animals suffer from hallucinations and displays of aggressive behavior. This progresses into paralysis (“foaming at the mouth” being caused by larynx paralysis and inability to swallow), respiratory paralysis, and death. Happily, infection can be prevented by vaccination.

The canine rabies vaccination is required by law in the state of New Hampshire. This vaccine is given once after 12 weeks of age. Your puppy will receive a booster vaccine after 1 year, then the vaccine is given every three years.

Bordetella: Kennel Cough is an infectious bronchitis of dogs characterized by a harsh, hacking cough. This bronchitis may be of brief duration and mild enough to warrant no treatment at all or it may progress all the way to a life-threatening pneumonia depending on which infectious agents are involved and the immunological strength of the patient. We vaccinate against one of the more common causative agents, Bordetella bronchiseptica. For puppies, vaccination provides good systemic immunity. We recommend receiving a booster vaccine every 6 months, especially if your dog will be going to dog parks, daycare, or boarding.

Bordetella bronchiseptica vaccination may not prevent infection. In some cases, vaccination minimizes symptoms of illness but does not entirely prevent infection.

Leptospirosis: Leptospirosis is a disease that can affect human and animals, including your pets. All animals can potentially become infected with leptospirosis. This bacterium causes fever, vomiting, diarrhea, severe weakness, and acute renal failure. There are many different strains of leptospirosis, and although our vaccine protects against the most common serovars it does not offer 100% immunity. Your puppy will receive an initial vaccination at 12 weeks of age, then receive a booster 4 weeks later. Immunity lasts 1 year, so this vaccine should be boosted yearly.

Lyme: Lyme disease is caused by the bacterium Borrelia burgdorferi which is transmitted by the bite of an infected tick. The incidence of Lyme disease in New England is extremely high, we are considered an endemic region of the country. Lyme disease in dogs has the potential to cause fever, lameness, and -rarely- kidney disease. We recommend your puppy receives and initial vaccination at 12 weeks of age, then receives a booster 4 weeks later. Immunity lasts one year, so this vaccine should be boostered yearly.

We don’t recommend taking your young puppy to public places until he or she receives at least two sets of vaccines. Use caution when visiting common areas such as dog parks and pet stores as risk of acquiring contagious diseases may increase.

Kittens

A doctor will work with you to determine which vaccines your kitten requires, based on their lifestyle and risk of exposure.

FVRCP: Feline distemper (more correctly called panleukopenia) is caused by a parvovirus and represents a life-threatening disease. The feline distemper / panleukopenia virus is considered ubiquitous, meaning it is in virtually every place that is not regularly disinfected. The infection is highly contagious among unvaccinated cats. The virus suppresses the production of white blood cells, causing your kitten to become immunocompromised and vulnerable to other infections. In the intestine, the virus causes ulceration that leads to diarrhea, and life-threatening dehydration as well as bacterial infection because the barrier between the body and intestinal bacteria is lost. The patient dies from either dehydration or secondary bacterial infection. Thankfully vaccination is so effective most cat owners will never see this devastating disease.

Due to a high rate of infection, the FVRCP vaccine is considered a core vaccine. It is given twice 2-3 weeks apart, starting at 8 weeks. A booster is given after 1 year, then administered every 3 years thereafter.

FeLV: Feline leukemia virus, is a common infection of cats. It is the cause of more cat deaths, directly or indirectly, than any other organism and is widespread in the cat population. This virus invariably turns into cancer in cats (leukemia or lymphoma), which are fatal. Outdoor cats should be vaccinated for feline leukemia (FeLV). Susceptibility for the feline leukemia virus is greatest in the first 12 months of life. Cats older than 12 months with a reasonable risk of exposure should be vaccinated as well. The FeLV vaccine is administered twice at 8 and 12 weeks of age. FeLV should be given one year after initial doses, then every 3 years thereafter.

FeLV/FIV Blood Testing: Part of your kitten package includes a baseline blood test to ensure that your newest addition isn’t infected with Feline Leukemia Virus or Feline Immunodeficiency Virus. The feline leukemia virus has potential to be latent (not cause symptoms) in a carrier cat without any signs of illness and this carrier state can persist for years. During this time, the cat is contagious and at risk for numerous problems. This is why it’s so important to test and ensure your kitten is negative. Both FIV and FeLV require special veterinary care and lifestyle changes, we’ll work hard to teach you everything you need to know if your kitten tests positive.

Rabies: Rabies is a devastating and fatal disease that affects our pets, wildlife, and even poses a threat to human health. Many people don’t know that the virus can incubate for up to a year after initial exposure before clinical signs occur; once symptoms begin death occurs within 10 days, and treatment is impossible. Infected animals suffer from hallucinations and displays of aggressive behavior. This progresses into paralysis (“foaming at the mouth” being caused by larynx paralysis and inability to swallow), respiratory paralysis, and death. Happily, infection can be prevented by vaccination.

The feline rabies vaccination is required by law in the state of New Hampshire. This vaccine is given once after 12 weeks of age, your kitten will receive a booster after 1 year, then every 3 years.

Office Hours

Monday:  8:30am – 6:00pm
Tuesday:   8:30am – 7:30pm
Wednesday:  8:30am – 6:00pm
Thursday:   8:30am – 7:30pm
Friday:   8:30am – 6:00pm
Saturday:   9:00am – 1:00pm
Sunday:   Closed

Phone: 603-357-2455
Email:
reception@courtstvet.com

686 Court Street Keene, NH 03431

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